Sunday, February 17, 2008

The day thou gavest, Lord, is ended

Concert day is over - Bach, Handel, and the recently added Telemann, are now done.

The overall impression was that it was a great show. Of course, as the director, I can quickly dwell on the tempos I want to take back, and the missed cue here and there, but I think by the time I wake up in the morning, I will feel that it was a pretty darn great show. Certainly, the last movement, arguably the hardest one, was brimming with adrenaline and excitement that most of the patrons who were there are probably still wondering what hit them.

I was a bit concerned in the morning while playing the organ at church, My focus on the service was a bit lost. I had a hard time with the first hymn, almost played the wrong gospel acclamation, and generally felt frantic at times not knowing what was coming next (a strange phenomenon, considering I've been doing this liturgy since I was eight years old), however the focus was obviously on the concert, and not on the task at hand. Once I got to the venue though, everything was fine. I was also fortunate enough to have a cast of soloists who were all great friends, and great musicians - a major calming influence in the green room!

Anyhow - the challenge, as always, will now be to put this concert behind me and concentrate on the next one. Normally this is something I am able to do well. The only time in my life that I've had a hard time "putting away" a concert, was when I conducted the St. John Passion for my last DMus recital. I have a feeling I will be analyzing this for for a few days yet as well.

2 comments:

I'm Still Me said...

Congratulations!

BobMac said...

"My focus on the service was a bit lost. I had a hard time with the first hymn, almost played the wrong gospel acclamation, and generally felt frantic at times not knowing what was coming next"

My term for this is "ten seconds behind the airplane" I recognize it well. You play stuff at sight perfectly, go through the first three verses of a hymn perfectly, and in the fourth verse, you don't know what key you're in...